Prisoners Of War Biography


A Prisoner Of War (POW) is a person, whether a combatant or a non-combatant,
who is held in custody by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict.
The earliest recorded usage of the phrase "Prisoner Of War" dates back to 1660.
Belligerents hold Prisoners Of War in custody for a range of legitimate and illegitimate reasons,
such as isolating them from enemy combatants still in the field (releasing and repatriating them in an orderly manner after hostilities),
demonstrating military victory, punishing them, prosecuting them for war crimes,
exploiting them for their labour, recruiting or even conscripting them as their own combatants,
collecting military and political intelligence from them, or indoctrinating them in new political or religious beliefs.
A Prisoner Of War (short form: POW) is a fighter who has been captured by the forces of the enemy, during an armed conflict.
In past centuries, prisoners had no rights. They were usually killed or forced to be slaves.
Nowadays Prisoners Of War have rights that are stated in the Geneva Conventions and other laws of war.


American Prisoners of War In japan were used for live experiments during WWII
American Prisoners of War In japan were-used for live experiments during WWII.jpg

German Prisoners of War russian-front-eastern-front WWII German Prisoners of War russian-front-eastern-front WWII.jpg

Italian Prisoners of War WWII Italian Prisoners of War.jpg

Japanese Prisoners of War at Guam Japanese Prisoners of War at Guam.gif

Prisoners of War WWII Prisoners of War.jpg

Chinese and North Korean's POW's At Camp In Pusan Chinese and North Korean's POW's At Camp In Pusan.jpg

German Prisoners Parade Moscow German Prisoners Parade Moscow.jpg

Stalingrad (Germany) WWII Stalingrad.jpg